Category Archives: Blogs

it is what we let it be

These picture does not have much to do with the text below, just shows one of the last times I went out for drinks a couple months ago. Nice cocktail bar at The Hawthorne in Boston.
I am probably the most anti-social person there is right now. Haven’t been out in ages, and it feels pretty good because I have so much that I dream of fulfilling work wise and I ought to keep my focus and priorities straight. Another reason to why I have so easy to avoid restaurants these days (I used to love going out for nice, warm, inspiring dinners before arriving to the US) is that I truly have hard eating out here in America, knowing that most of the food you get served in restaurants here are not really real food, but filled with genetically modified organisms, fillers, synthetic binders, unnatural flavors and colours (not even talking about all the hormones cause I do not eat meat, and dairy only on extremely rare occasions). You know all those things that are banned in food production in Europe, but for money reasons are still allowed here in the US. There aren’t that many establishments around here that serves purely organic, non-gmo food with lots of vegan options, so honestly, why waste my money when I can make all what I want myself from scratch?
I know how pessimistic and awful this sounds, but it is the reality and I have always preferred being a realist rather than closing my eyes and escaping the truth. The more we know, the more complicated life becomes in one sense. But on the other hand, knowledge also gives us a chance to open our hearts to the truly real things in life. Even if they seem so few these days. Knowledge helps us reduce the distance and mental barriers between ourselves and all the wrong we have been taught (or brainwashed with) previously.
There are moments, for example when Alex and I ride the bike on our short weekend trips, that I for a second can feel a sadness for not being able to stop by McDonalds for a burger, or a road side diner and truly enjoy a greasy pizza and an ice-cold coke. You know the way one had always visualized a road trip through big ole America. And while it still happens that I give in and shut my brain off for a moment, and eat a slice or two of a veggie pizza with a crust made by gmo corn flour, additives and toxic fillers, and just a tad of cheese filled with antibiotic and growth hormones in one of the cute old-school pizza restaurants that we drive past, there’s no way I can ever enjoy the experience like I probably would have, say, only two-three years ago. I know too much know.
Alex whom always have had a deep love for animals sometimes jokes (with a bit of truth in it) that he wish I had never started investigating in the way farm animals are treated, as the pleasure he always felt by eating meat now has decreased dramatically to the extent that he chooses to eat meat only approx. twice weekly. It’s a weird thing, to suddenly gain a whole new uncomfortable perspective on something you’ve always taken for granted. How can you learn to despise something you’ve always loved? Or thought you loved. Glad to say that neither of us have been to a Burger King or McDonalds in over a year now.
This is an informative clip from Oprah’s world, when her and her 300 something staff went vegan for a week.

The slaughter house they get to visit in the clip above is obviosuly the most modern facility in the United States and it is a much better place to be for your last day in life as an animals than most other slaughter houses so keep that in mind. It is most of the times much worse.

Another thing I’d like to recommend, many American readers have probably heard of Foodbabe already, if not, head over there immediately if you have the slightest interest in your future health, especially if you’re American. This post of hers shows well what a huge difference of ingredients that is used in some of the most commercial food brands in the US vs. Europe. Foodbabe, or Vani Hari that is her real name, is a food activist who has got companies such as Kraft, Subway, Starbucks and many more to change their ingredients due to her strong voice, knowledge and the massive following she has on her blog. Read this for an overall view of the largest cases she’s successfully worked on and the outstanding changes she’s accomplished.

Her activist work is obviously not popular with the big food corporations, but her willingness to expose the truth about food in an understandable manner has helped hundreds of thousand people to start eating healthier. In a country with 33% obesity and a rapid increase of cancer, autism and other illnesses that are caused by processed foods and toxins found in the water and food supply, people like her are well needed.

For a whole other reason than food I went in on Target the other day, and I was positively surprised to see what an extensive organic food collection they boasted with. Juices and crackers that I’ve normally become familiar with in Whole Foods were at Target priced at 20-40% less. And I recently read that Walmart who with an internal research discovered that 91% of their customers would buy organic if the price was lower (I had no clue that Walmart even sold foods?), is now teaming up with Wild Oats to create an in-house line of 100 products of affordable organic foods. A great initiative and intent to drive down organic food prices in the country.

The change is happening, albeit slowly. But the more we choose to spend our dollars on good, organic and non-gmo foods, the faster will we see an increase of better food on the shelves, for a price that suits more people. Organic food should not have to be as expensive as it is right now. Consumer demand drives the market and it is not before we demand a change by living by example that a change will come. And for every time you opt for buying foods that are harmful to the world and your own health, you add on distance to the healthy change in our food supply that we all need now, and especially for our future.

You do look for these two sign when you go grocery shopping, don’t you?

 
I can’t say I fully trust the USDA labeling with all its loopholes in regulations but I definitely have faith in the independent non-profit, non-governmental Non-Gmo Project so a combination of these both is what I’m looking for, but always the Non-Gmo one. My local fruit and veggies come from farms and markets, and tropical and non seasonal imported is always organic. I don’t want pesticides and toxins in my smoothie just because someone else decided they make more profit that way.
I know that this particular Non-Gmo labeling only can be found in the US and Canada. But you might have other labels in other countries that helps you avoid the bad stuff? Most European countries as well as Australia and many South American, African and Asian countries demand labeling of all GMO’s which has forced American companies to change their ingredients in products sold outside the US to such without genetically engineered organisms. But still they do occur, so please read the ingredient information on all food you intend eating.

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weekend tripping

As something of a tradition (cause we are getting older now it seems and we suddenly feel like it is nice to have some sort of routines in our lives), we left the boat early in the weekend and headed as South as possible for a two day trip. The Cape wouldn’t be much warmer than Southern Boston we thought, but at least the forecast gave promise of a sunny 27C (80F) in the whole region and so a beach town felt like just the right sort of entertainment in between two industrious weeks of work. 
We drove through winding roads on old state highway 3A, over the Sagamore Bridge that we’ve sailed beneath a couple times previously, onto Route 28 through gorgeous towns and bays of South Western part of the Cape all the way down to Woods Hole. It’s pretty remarkable how beautiful is the nature and relaxed atmosphere of the Cape, so glad we got to do another trip down before all colours fade out for winter. If only the weather could stay like this, we repeated, like what if this was the coldest it would get in a year. What a waste of wishes.
The above images are from a wonderful vintage motel called The Old Landing that we had the great pleasure to stay in. David who owns and runs this little gem of a place at the very bottom of the cape in Dennisport by Nantucket Sound, is a fun and hospitable boniface, originally from California. The type that tells you great stories and makes you coffee in the morning. Motels (or motor-hotels) can be a hit or miss, and you can’t always be sure to find a place that’s as clean as you require, but this was hands down the tidiest and freshest of all motels we’ve ever stayed anywhere. Big love of course for the old school feel and trippy colours in our room. Would not have expected to feel so good about this place, judging by the (also old school) website of the property that we checked before arriving. But I guess a good surprise is better than a bad one.
If you ever plan to stay anywhere on the Cape, make sure to consider getting in touch with David at The Landing Hotel. Did I mention the beach is across the street from your room? And they have their own clam shack/bakery in which you can get served homemade pastry for breakfast, right by the water.

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Provincetown

While I am busy cooking and baking away here in the kitchen, why don’t you have a peek at some photos from Provincetown that we sailed to a few months ago? This is the blue anchorage we woke up in, the day after arriving to the fireworks. Surrounded by plenty of boats and a cooling breeze.
Quick breakfast in town. Green smoothie for moi and a coffee and almond croissant for Mr.
Ptown is full of cute houses as well as larger mansions. Everything very well manicured of course.
If you for some odd reason would want to swim in the 12ºC cold water (mid summer temperature), you better watch out for the great whites.
Just another beautiful garden.
Everywhere cute boys and men in tank tops, as well manicured as the gardens. 95% of all people you see over there, seemed to be men. It is the gay town of Massachusetts after all. I wonder how this beautiful summer town looks in the fall and winter. Quiet?
Definitely have to find a way to escape South at least for a week this winter. It’s fascinating, I think, how white, almost grayish and dead-looking ones skin can become when not exposed to a big old star that is located approximately 92 million miles away from us. What is it by the way that makes us value sun kissed skin above pale? Is a tan a sign of health and freedom perhaps? In other cultures, like in India and other parts of Asia, a fair skin is higher regarded than dark and skin whitening cream products is an $18 billion market. 
Anyways.. here’s the beach at low tide. Isn’t it curious that here in Ptown, the tidal range is approximately 10 ft (3 meter) from low to high tide. While in Martha’s Wineyard on the other side of the cape some 40 miles away, the difference is only two-three ft (1 m). This is a good site to check the tides around the cape. 
Speaking of sea level and tides, some of you have probably seen this already as the study is a couple years now, but I find it interesting that the East Coast of America is experiencing a much faster sea level rise than other parts of the world (three to four times the global average). Read more about it here
Our French friend Christian had also sailed over for the fourth of July weekend.

Beautiful blues..

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morning rituals and daily duties

Thanks for all your sweet comments both on the blog and our Facebook. It feels pretty awesome to have decided to stick around here a little longer and see where our work and ideas can take us. It’s a whole new chapter and a very exciting one for many different reasons. Our main purpose with “sailing the world” was indeed to find nice and fulfilling places to stay, for a short time or for a longer before we head towards a new adventure, and it seems this stop in the US will have to be considered one of the longer ones for now. 
Since work is and will be our main occupation during this prolonged US chapter, I find it more important than ever to find peace and balance from within. I am the sort of person that can spend 20 of the days 24 hours on a project if I only love and feel for it from the bottom of my heart, so I need to balance out the number of hours spent on working, with something that keeps me grounded. I have a lot of great intentions, but I also know that I can easily get caught up in things, on the border of becoming obsessive. While working hard and pushing boundaries is a good thing, it is never healthy to let anything consume you wholly. It’s always good to back off, recharge and come back with objective eyes and a quiet mind. Daily yoga helps so much with that part. 
So what’s even better with the amazing kitchen space that I work from, is that above it is an unoccupied loft office space, and which we have sort of transformed into a private little yoga studio. I normally arrive around 9 am and start my mornings with 45 minutes yoga and meditation up there, and finish the evening with a little longer session. The video shows some of what I worked on this morning. Core strength and balance. 
This might seem silly, but below is a schedule which demonstrates pretty much how I have planned my days for the moment. I have made this one just to be sure that I get done all what I want to have accomplished in a day. 
The small image of me in the right corner is a clip from a video I’m working on finishing.

Being in the start up process and very much in the experimental stage of things, I try to limit waste of time in each day. I know how social media and other news sites tend to drag you in, and how easy it is to get disoriented if anything random pops up out of the blue, but once you’ve firmly decided how more or less you want your days to proceed and when you’ve learnt to keep and promote that idea in your subconscious, it’s easier to stick to what you are supposed to be doing. Besides obviously being very determined as to what I look to achieve, I find writing plans and notes for myself very useful. Might be a female thing, what do you think?
That’s roughly how most of my weekdays look like right now. Weekends Alex and I try to head out with the bike or do something other than work. Good thing with being freelancers or working on your own projects, is that you can switch days and hours as you please. But even so, I find having an overall knowledge of what you want and where you wish to be heading is a good strategy for every aspect in life. Lessens amount of time wasted and you’ll steadily transport yourself towards your goals.
This is a great toast I made today (besides a pretty awesome carrot/ginger soup and the eleventh version of brownie of the last few days). It’s home made olive tapenade with capers, parsley, zesty lemon juice, sea salt and olive oil on a thinly sliced and toasted (home made) whole-wheat bread with a filet of avocado and garden fresh heirloom tomato… approved by 4 of 4 people in the kitchen :)
Do you also write lists and practice yoga or how do you keep yourself focused?

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right here right now

Why have you decided to stay longer in the US? – a question we’ve encountered many times as of late and I’m sorry if I haven’t been as informative and personal here in the blog this past year, but real life has gotten some well deserved attention. I owed my life that attention after too many years of flaunting my life in the open nothing. To keep things straight and simple, I can go ahead and tell you that the main reason to why we have decided to stay in the US for at least another year is …… (drumroll please) : 
$$$

Not so surprised are you. 
After four-five years of living and traveling in our floating home aka a sailboat, we felt it was time to get back into some sort of stability mode. Financial stability I’m talking, the sort of stability that comes when you generate enough money to support the life you love living. There has been many ways we’ve made our living during this journey so far (after we ran out of savings some 1,5-2 years in), but the temporary ways were often only good for a short while. Even though they were fulfilling in their own regards, neither the blog incomes (made approx. $15k annually when blog was most active), or Alex’s carbon fiber design and construction ($40-100/hour) were jobs that we truthfully loved doing (blogging full time and having sponsors and daily traffic to promote adds stress to life, and working under scorching hot sun with toxic chemicals has its toll on your health), and so we knew that the only way for us to be able to happily continue sailing around the world or whatever we later decided to do, we definitely needed to find a way to get back to earning dineros in ways that sat good with our souls. Cause we didn’t only have us to feed, we had a new/old boat to renovate. 
Alex missed the mastering, and I started to get fed up with having to blog when sometimes I had nothing to blog about and all I wanted was to be free from sponsors and ads and live a more discreet life. If you’ve followed, you know how I slowly began removing one sponsor and collab after another.
Money is not everything in life, but it is needed, period. So when we found ourselves in the neighborhoods (Panama isn’t thaaat far from America after all), we figured the US would be the best place in which we could make a decent living, finally fix the boat up completely, and also be able to save up for the future. Because if it’s one thing we’ve learnt during these years on the go, it is that it is not very comfortable nor pleasant to be broke. Especially not when you also live on a boat that is in need of a major renovation. It was the right time to reintroduce financial stability into our lives. And working with the things you love rather than slaving for something you do not quite believe in as much, is a human right and need imo.
Even if New England doesn’t offer the best of climates (actually one of the worst places if it’s weather we’re talking), it just so happened that it introduced us to the perfect set of opportunities. Alex got a splendid deal with the mastering studio from which he freelances today, a studio owned by Jonathan Wyner who’s an associate professor at Berklee College of Music and one of the most renowned mastering engineers in the world. 
And for myself that always have had a dream of one day opening my very own personable restaurant, I have got the greatest opportunity to explore that field and begin practicing and testing my way to my unique style. You might know it already, but our dear friend who actually was the first one to lure us into coming to visit in New England a couple years ago, is the owner of a larger incubator kitchen space of 4000 sq ft. A place that rents to caterers, chefs and start up food companies, and in which we have built a section for my very first food business. This is how it looks, don’t you just love the old fashion maple tree baker’s table that we just installed?
I will tell you more later on, but my first intention is to offer simple but healthy, homemade, vegan, organic and non-gmo meals and sweets for take out and delivery in the Southern Boston area. Menu testing, website building and marketing is what I’m up to day and night at the moment, and I can’t even begin to explain how wonderful it is to be working on such a meaningful personal project, in such a beautiful, inspiring environment to that. It does (most of the times) make me forget the fact that the vicious cold winter is knocking on the door.
Having seen and felt what life feels and taste like in approx. 50 countries in total (Alex’s, mine and our mutual travels combined), America would not be at the top of our dream-locations-for-living list. But again, do we have the same set of opportunities any elsewhere at this moment? Answer to that is a big fat no. Even if our ideal place to live still is somewhere in the Mediterranean, we must also consider the national economy and direct abilities for us to do what we wish to be doing. And from that current viewpoint, this area of the US is really the best for us, for right now. America has many flaws, but it is still the land of opportunities.
If you’re a human being of flesh and blood you know that anything is always possible, so we’re taking it easy on the planning side of life. For now we’re just hoping to keep doing what we love doing, and we’re working towards having equal amount of entrepreneurial success, as peace, fluidness and comfort in our everyday life. We still live on the boat and will do so until November I believe. If we lived in a perfect world, we’d live on the boat year round cause that is what home is to us, but there’s something called miserable New England winter that comes in between. One winter was definitely enough for the boat and us to be bedded under the snow. Duende should then be back in the water again in April next year.
Isn’t life amazing the way it moves and spins you around. I think it’s healthy to sometimes step out of your fixed ideas and stop yearning for something else all the time, and just surrender to what’s thrown at you. Take a moment and look around, and you might well find yourself right where you are supposed to be.

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golden beetle

There’s something special about handmade things isn’t it? When you know that someone has taken the time and effort to actually use their physical (wo)manpower to create something that you can wear and admire for a lifetime. It adds a very special value to the things we own, rather than filling our surroundings with mass fabricated, machine made products that everyone else has.
My friend Jade who is the talented designer behind We Dream In Colour that I often talk about, has just finished her book called “Beautiful bracelets by hand” – an excellent DIY guide book that help you creating beautiful and unique arm pieces. 
If you like the lovely patina dyed brass necklace with a golden beetle from Jade’s current collection that I’m wearing, check it out in my store with a 10% blog discount: www.shop.worldtourstories.com 

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330 miles

We left Massachusetts the other day for a trip down South towards Connecticut, passing through small towns of Rhode Island, with final destination the quaint and absolutely beautiful seaside village of Mystic. Driving through miles and miles of forests, past meadows and sleepy towns, the occasional run on I-195, and finally checking in to a reasonably neat roadside motel for $49 a night, we got a little taste of what an extended road trip in America would feel like. A shame our jobs keeps us mad busy this fall, otherwise we’d head right back out and to more southern climates in a second. So many states out there to explore..

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going with the flow

Given that we’re now planning to stay in the US of A for at least another year, we’ve figured it could be wise to insure and also register the boat here for the time being, for various reasons. It is a little odd seeing the American flag flying off the stern of the boat, but it’s also a manifestation of how unexpected, surprising and… odd life is. I like not being cemented into certain ideals and thinking patterns, and to go with and accept what life throws at you is more my personal melody. I think Duende is pretty happy regardless, she was after all made here in New England. In Bristol, Rhode Island in 1971, to be more precise.
This is a pretty nice picture of our beloved vessel, but it is quite funny to notice that we still haven’t got around to get that dodger ordered and installed. Always something that comes in between us and the dodger. First in St Maarten where price was reasonable, $800 I think it was, but we never felt we had money enough to order it. And now here in the US where everything good costs a smaller fortune ($2,200 for a sunbrella dodger without the frame!?), we figured we’ve anyways sailed without it for three years now so why stress, and so we got a bike instead. Much more useful this fall. Looking at this pic I also realize our AeroGen 4 wind generator is still missing three out of six blades (they blew off and away in sudden close to hurricane winds in Santa Marta, Colombia two years ago). Luckily we’ve been docked in marinas most time since then so we haven’t had urgent need of the wind generator, but.. if anyone know where we can find replacement blades, do let us know. 
Here are some more pics from Boston Harbor Islands that were taken a couple months ago.
Beautiful nature around here indeed. It saddens me a bit that we won’t have time to sail up to Maine this year. Still have got to get used to these super short sailing seasons. But we will do all what we can to enjoy the nature of this country also in the fall. On the road most likely, until spring and summer is back with us again.

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going with the flow

Given that we’re now planning to stay in the US of A for at least another year, we’ve figured it could be wise to insure and also register the boat here for the time being, for various reasons. It is a little odd seeing the American flag flying off the stern of the boat, but it’s also a manifestation of how unexpected, surprising and… odd life is. I like not being cemented into certain ideals and thinking patterns, and to go with and accept what life throws at you is more my personal melody. I think Duende is pretty happy regardless, she was after all made here in New England. In Bristol, Rhode Island in 1971, to be more precise.
This is a pretty nice picture of our beloved vessel, but it is quite funny to notice that we still haven’t got around to get that dodger ordered and installed. Always something that comes in between us and the dodger. First in St Maarten where price was reasonable, $800 I think it was, but we never felt we had money enough to order it. And now here in the US where everything good costs a smaller fortune ($2,200 for a sunbrella dodger without the frame!?), we figured we’ve anyways sailed without it for three years now so why stress, and so we got a bike instead. Much more useful this fall. Looking at this pic I also realize our AeroGen 4 wind generator is still missing three out of six blades (they blew off and away in sudden close to hurricane winds in Santa Marta, Colombia two years ago). Luckily we’ve been docked in marinas most time since then so we haven’t had urgent need of the wind generator, but.. if anyone know where we can find replacement blades, do let us know. 
Here are some more pics from Boston Harbor Islands that were taken a couple months ago.
Beautiful nature around here indeed. It saddens me a bit that we won’t have time to sail up to Maine this year. Still have got to get used to these super short sailing seasons. But we will do all what we can to enjoy the nature of this country also in the fall. On the road most likely, until spring and summer is back with us again.

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Food in our everyday lives

Oh food. Such a delicate, controversial yet so life important subject, especially if you live in the United States where big companies make big bucks on poisoning the world and society with something they call food, but which in reality is something completely different. Dangerous pesticides are sprayed on fields consisting of something reminiscent of food, but which has been altered in such a way that it has lost its DNA, in favor of profit. The pesticides used on these fields all over America can later on be found in the groundwater (most peoples drinking water), and even in raindrops. 
These poisonous substances does not only make us and our children sicker and sicker in form of a steady increase of asthma, cancer, autism, birth defects only to name a few. But it also destroys the earth and nature for future generations. Not to mention how the meat industry is responsible for a high level of deforestation around the world, how it pollutes the air with its 575 billions of pound of waste each year in the US (that’s half a trillion tons of bacteria, parasite, urine, blood that must go somewhere) and last not but not least, the purely selfish thing that it is, to breed and take the lives of 3 billion animals a year, only in the United States.
It’s tiring and so utterly sad, the reality that our life necessary food has come to with such a devastating change in the past thirty-forty years. And it feels like we constantly must be on our guard to not let the evil enter too near into our lives. That is, if you care about your health, the nature and the worlds future. 
Exactly that has grown to become one of my most valued interests and I feel I cannot not care about it and do something about it all in the small ways that I can, because I’ve realized that everything starts from there. We need food, without food we cannot survive. But what are we willing to sacrifice in order to get fed? And how can we help each other to eliminate the bad, and lead a healthier life?
This past year I have come to better know the food industry from the inside. Through a few restaurants, cafes and other food businesses I’ve dealt with food on a daily basis this past year. From sourcing of ingredients and produce, to help preparing it, and finally interacting with the consumers in various environments. I made it my mission to obtain a broader understanding of what it is one actually get served, and how aware the general person is when it comes to what they ingest. 
It’s been an internal and personal study purely for myself until now, but seeing how important the issue is, and how little most people are aware, it has made me convinced to take my passion to another level, and actively fight for peoples right to know what is in their food. 
From these various kitchens and dining rooms around the state, I am now back in my experimental kitchen corner that my friend so kindly set up and let me use, and which is part of a larger commercial kitchen complex. This is pure awesomeness of course in every which way, especially since the complex is filled with nice and friendly human guinea-pigs that most of the times (haha!) are happy to try my all organic, non-gmo and vegan concoctions before I, hopefully one day, will introduce them to the public. 
I will tell you more about my plans and ideas later on, but one thing that I have been thinking of, to let you into my little world of food, is to post a series of short videos. Where I go through everything from how to prepare quick, easy and delicious vegan meals, what products I love and which I believe is good to stay away from, how to do grocery shopping a more conscious every day business, meeting with inspiring people and much more.
I’ve been marinating this video idea for over a year but haven’t really had time to go about it before now. But before I start, I would need to know if this is something you’d be interested in? How health and environmentally conscious do you eat and buy groceries today, and would you be interested in learning more? Given that I spend almost all my awaken time thinking, planning, studying, cooking, baking and researching about food, I feel it’s a waste to not share my ideas and discoveries with others :)

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What success means to me and the 7 most important things in life

Does it sometimes feel like you’d like to cut yourself in several parts to be able to keep up with life and its obligations? “I wish the day had more hours” is a typical saying you often hear said out loud, often with a leaning towards pride in the voice. Manifesting a belief that being stressed and busy is a sign of being successful. 
Being ambitious and productive most certainly moves life forward. You make more money, you meet more people, you travel to more places, you might learn more, you see more, you experience more, you get to consume more, you …. and suddenly a sense of non-fulfillment, dissatisfaction and failure catches up on you. 
You get difficulty sleeping, you might get anxious and worried that you’re missing out, you blame yourself for not being adequate enough, for not being the best friend/partner/parent that you would want to be, you stress out for not having all the clothes, things and material you’d like to possess. And the sense of constantly lacking something eats you up from inside, leaving you feeling that the only way to get rid of that sense of emptiness, is to keep filling the empty hole with more things, more experiences, more achievements. More of everything.
People have different ways of expressing dissatisfaction in life. It could be by comparing themselves with others, throwing a jealous glance at what someone else have that you don’t. Some get greedy and step on people to move forward. Down-talking or gossiping about others. Some people get depressed and take to binge eating, or the opposite; you starve yourself cause you feel you’re never really skinny enough. Others simply run through life so fast they start neglecting the things that are, or should be, the most important aspects in a humans life:
Eat healthy – Sleep well – Value, show appreciation and give time to people close to your heart – Show respect and kindness to others – Connect to nature – Be true to yourself and your beliefs – Breathe easy. 
Breathe easy.

Let the feeling of insufficiency shake off your shoulders. 
Be thankful for what you have and scale down material needs and social expectations.
The roadrunner lifestyle that many people voluntarily sign up for pushes a human soul from its core needs and replaces natural human growth with superficial wealth. That sort of rushed lifestyle is destructive to the real experiences, love and natural fulfillment you could be gaining, would you only allow yourself to stop looking for happiness on the outside, and realize true harmony can only be achieved by being content with what you have, and where you are right now. 
Scaling down, with no need and urge to constantly do and gain and achieve something. Removing false layers of unhealthy behaviours and a quest for material richness, and opening your heart to what really is important – is the best gift you can give yourself and the people you have close.
Success, in my world, is not measured by what you have achieved, what things you own and how much money you’ve made, and therefore does wealthy people or finically successful businessmen and women seldom inspire me more than anyone else. Because money and material in itself has no soul connection and an image can easily be bought and adopted by anyone with the right set of opportunities.
Success, according to me, is merely measured by how well you’ve managed to incorporate your core desires into your everyday life, and how much you truthfully enjoy living the life you’ve created for yourself without a need of flaunting or exaggerating or being malicious or greedy to make yourself look greater/happier/more successful/more intelligent than the next person. 
Success to me is also being truthful to your real values, values gained by self sourcing information without jumping onto the beliefs of the loudest outside influencer, and by always being reflective to both sides of a coin. It is being fair and consistent in what you believe regardless of the political, financial or social outcome of your beliefs and your expression of them. It is having integrity as well as having an understanding for others.
Success comes when you are at peace with what you have and where you are regardless of the battles and suffering we all have to go through every once in a while. And when you have learnt that being helpful and kind to others offer a greater sense of fulfillment than always putting yourself and your own needs first.
I, like every human being fail to live up to all this at all times, but having developed a good sense of when I feel most at peace and when things feel just so right, it is today much easier to hold onto my core beliefs than what it might have been in the past when I still filled my life with all kinds of distractions and unhealthier behaviours. 
Time and life makes your human soul and mind grow and develop to the better, but only if you allow it to. Keep your heart open, and guide yourself to the good you know is true and right from within.

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easy rider

Two of the things Alex have missed the most on our years of sailing (besides family and friends of course), was to work in a studio, and owning a Harley again. You know already that he’s back in the studio for the time being, and so the search for the perfect bike has been something that’s consumed most of our evenings as of late. My evenings too, cause what every sensible woman know, is that the way to (world) peace and happiness is to first make sure her man is happy. 
So after a few weeks of search on Ebay and Craigslist we finally found this stunning red beauty for the right price, low mileage and much closer to home than expected. Well that is after I managed to fend off the ideas of buying a super cheap and run down Harley cause “I can fix it up in no time”.. Hell no, can’t deal with another renovation project now that the boat finally starts to feel alright.
He’s owned many Harley’s before, and this particular one from 98 is very similar to the Dyna Super Glide 98 that he had previously, though this one is a Wide Glide and red instead of the blue he had before.
Given that it also was his birthday yesterday, it wouldn’t have been possible to find a better thing to do than head out on our first ride in four years. Especially since the glorious summer weather’s still going strong here in New England. We rode through Cohasset and the stunning Jerusalem road and Atlantic Ave, and down through Marshfield and Duxbury and back. 
And what does this bike purchase mean for our sailing journey now you wonder? Well we’ve decided to stick around the US a bit longer, still have so much to see outside of MA and there’s still so much business for us both to take care of here. Now that our O-visa applications for three years got approved as well (much thanks to experienced and super knowledgeable lawyer Eric Lorenzo at Barst Mukamal in NYC), everything is much easier both work and travel wise. 
In regards to the bikes future, it probably won’t be a walk in the park, but it is definitely technically possible to bring the bike with us anywhere we go with the boat, dismounted below deck, if we really wanted to. Shipping is obviously another option if it comes to that. Thankfully we don’t have to plan that far ahead in time right now and we’re going to try and enjoy the most of this end to the summer that there is left. And then plan for some nice out of state bike excursions for fall..

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